September 6, 2017

Covered Under Warranty?

(Maybe...)

CRASH!!!!    Your 8-channel liquid handling robot arm just raked across the deck and one of the z-axis rods looks bent.   No problem, just call the manufacturer and have them come fix it, after all, it is still under warranty...right?   Well, maybe...

Most instrument warranties cover parts and labor but, that usually comes with the expectation that the failure is due to normal wear and tear, not abuse or unintended usage.  Using the liquid handler failure above as an example, the 8-channel arm likely got damaged because it failed to move to a safe Z-travel height before moving in X or Y.    But, was that because the arm failed to execute that command or because the programmer failed to instruct the arm to do so?   While a failure such as this might not occur in assays that have been running successfully for some period of time, they are more common when the user is still developing the assay or debugging it.   This type of failure could also occur because an operator forgot to retract the arm after some assay interruption or error condition.

Many OEM's (Original Equipment Manufacturer) will work with you to get the instrument back online and some may even be tolerant of such failures to the point of covering the associated costs under their warranty..but, you will most likely find there is a limit to their understanding.   If an instrument fails under normal usage, OEM's should and will cover repair costs but if an instrument fails again, or frequently due to operator error the OEM could and should charge for parts and labor and travel, even though the unit is under warranty.  Although such a stance would be unpopular for end-users, it is really no different than what you might experience in other areas of your life.  If you use your SUV to haul a boat that exceeds the vehicles gross towing rate you will probably damage your transmission or rear axle.  Should you expect Ford or GM pay for that?   The honest answer is, no.

Whether you bought the instrument new and are under the original warranty, or if you have purchased an extended warranty, make sure you understand just what kinds of failures are covered.   Ask up front.   Even if you purchase refurbished instruments, there is a limit to they nature of the failures that are covered (BTW - you should always insist on a minimum of a 6 month warranty on refurbished equipment). New or used, a warranty is a quality statement by the provider.   Buying instruments "AS IS" or with a "Money Back Guarantee" should set off alarm bells that the low price option that looks so attractive today, could prove to be a costly investment in the future.   Caveat Emptor...   

What options should you consider when the warranty expires?   That will be the subject of our next blog...

 

August 11, 2017

Got Liquid Handling Problems? Part 1

We can help...

Been A While Since You Had Your EVO or Genesis Serviced?

 

The LabSquad can provide a variety of cost-effective service options;

  • Basic Tune-Up PM's

  • Comprehensive OEM-Style PM's

  • Performance Verification

  • Relocation Assistance

  • Annual Service Contracts

Just let us know how we can help!

 

May 14, 2013

Every Picture Tells A Story, Don’t It?

A picture is worth a thousand words…so even at a reduced frame rate of 15FPS, one minute of video has to be worth 900,00 words.” – Me

For better or worse, advances in cellular communications arecameraphonemaking the once seemly impossible, trivial.  Specifically, I am referring to video communication.   Just about everyone has a ‘smartphone’ these days and it is hard to find a new phone that does not include a camera.   The resolution of these cameras is incredible (the Apple iPhone 5 = 8 MegaPixels) and product stunningly clear videos and images.

Video applications such as Apple’s FaceTime and Skype make face to face remote communications simple, fast and cheap.   For service organizations, this has providedthermal imagingfield based techs with an incredible tool for diagnosing instrument failures.    There are even iPhone apps that now allow users to perform thermal imaging (how cool is that…no pun intended)!  Let’s face it, the pressure these on-site techs feel when faced with a failed instrument can be enormous.  End user anxiety and a ticking clock only add to the stress.   The ability to ‘phone a friend’, point the phone at the instrument and have a real-time conversation about such failures brings an added dimension to peer review.

On the wired side, I have visited many research labs that have added low-cost USB or Ethernet cameras to their automation systems that allow them to monitor status remotely (many times from home, over a weekend or at night).   When combined with remote network access tools like PC Anywhere or LogMeIn, it is possible to deal with simple application errors and continue assays or applications that would otherwise had to wait for human to come into the lab and simple press a key.   Remote observation in this fashion requires network access and must always include IT departments to prevent unauthorized access.

Still, many labs will not allow non-employee cameras or video use within their labs.  Thisskype5is short-sighted (IMO), and unfortunate.   I understand the competitive nature of pharmaceutical or biotech research and the commercial implications of potentially providing competitors with a glimpse of a labs inner workings, but let’s face it…it would take a pretty savvy bunch of people to gleam something worthwhile from a phone camera.  Instrument failures that render an instrument ‘down’ are generally easier to diagnose and repair, however it the aberrant or irregular failures that could benefit immensely from remote observation.   Unless an instrument or system is under a service contract it can be very expensive to pay for a service tech to sit and watch for a reported failure (they always happen when the tech leaves, right?).

Most labs require non-disclosure agreements or safety training prior to granting non-employees access their labs and the time is well past to include the use of remote diagnostic tools, particularly cellular video in such protocols.   Perhaps seeing is believing?

April 22, 2013

Crowd Sourcing Instrument Support?

Makers_3d_2Just finished Chris Anderson’s (editor Wired Magazine) new book, “Makers The New Industrial Revolution.”   In this book, Anderson does a great job of highlighting how the internet, 3D printing and crowd sourcing are enabling small batch manufacturing and prototyping.  He ultimately predicts a resurgence in US-based manufacturing and a diminished need for venture capital so often required to create companies and bring products to market.

Anyone who followed the recent investigation of the Boston Marathon bombing and the ensuing manhunt saw first-hand the power of the crowd.   Tens of thousands of web-connected citizens poured over photos and videos that would have taken federal and local police agencies weeks or months.  Within hours of releasing low quality photos, both suspects were identified and flushed out of the darkness.

Similarly, an article from The Scientist recently posited the idea of crowd sourcing drug discovery.  The thinking here is that waiting for new chemical entities to fail in Phase II studies is as unfair to patients as it is to the researchers who toil in redundant efforts.   The brute force approach of high throughput screening did little to bring new drugs to market meetupfaster.    Last year, a Harvard Med School student and budding entrepreneur named Shantanu Gaur started  a group at Meetup.com in an attempt to create a drug discovery collective.    His ethos is built around the mantra of  replacing “publish or perish” with “share or despair.”   For an industry that strives on peer review, overcoming IP issues that enable crowd thinking could provide the massively parallel efforts that will streamline understanding and treatment of diseases .

None of this is new to lab instrument support.   For a number of years now, users have been able to interact with each other as well as vendors and independent support organizations via forums such as LRIG and LabWrench.    Users  share similar experiences as hints and tips come from current or past employees of instrument manufacturers.   Some manufacturers have even created user forums to help support their products.    Still, a fair amount of knowledge about instruments is proprietary and closely protected by manufacturers.   This is understandable as many of these companies rely upon post-sales support revenue as an important component of their balance sheets.   The one thing missing from breaking this logjam is a more formal unification of the user community.  The power of the crowd lies within the sheer number of end-users for lab instruments.    Figure out a way for all users to speak with one voice and the leverage of the crowd will move the way instruments are supported.

But, how to do that is the subject of one of my next postings…

February 6, 2013

Support My…Asset

For all you self-maintainers out there, some great reference sites;

  1. Lab Wrench – a great Q & A site where folks can post questions and get the community of users, maintainers and current/former field service techs.   Not always the fastest way to get answers, but if your needs are not immediate well worth a try.
  2. LRIG Forum – The place to reach out to those in the know in the area lab automation.  Expect some commercial pitches from vendors from time to time but by and large the people who subscribe to this message board are really interested in helping each other out.  You will get lots of great guidance on how to make instruments interact (integrate), and a fair amount of troubleshooting expertise.
  3. LabX – Not really an interactive forum but you will find a number of companies that may be selling a product similar to yours.   Often these folks wind up servicing/refurbishing used products prior to listing them here and may be able to help you out.  If nothing else, it gives you an option for replacing your troubled instrument if you cannot repair it (use your device as a parts donor).
  4. Google – Seriously, did I really have to include a hot link to Google?   If you needed that, please put down any sharp tools and step away from the lab…   Believe it or not, Google can lead you to a number of academic research sites that store copies of user manuals, many of which include basic troubleshooting or replacement part numbers.

And of course, you can always contact us at info@TheLabSquad.com