September 6, 2017

Covered Under Warranty?

(Maybe...)

CRASH!!!!    Your 8-channel liquid handling robot arm just raked across the deck and one of the z-axis rods looks bent.   No problem, just call the manufacturer and have them come fix it, after all, it is still under warranty...right?   Well, maybe...

Most instrument warranties cover parts and labor but, that usually comes with the expectation that the failure is due to normal wear and tear, not abuse or unintended usage.  Using the liquid handler failure above as an example, the 8-channel arm likely got damaged because it failed to move to a safe Z-travel height before moving in X or Y.    But, was that because the arm failed to execute that command or because the programmer failed to instruct the arm to do so?   While a failure such as this might not occur in assays that have been running successfully for some period of time, they are more common when the user is still developing the assay or debugging it.   This type of failure could also occur because an operator forgot to retract the arm after some assay interruption or error condition.

Many OEM's (Original Equipment Manufacturer) will work with you to get the instrument back online and some may even be tolerant of such failures to the point of covering the associated costs under their warranty..but, you will most likely find there is a limit to their understanding.   If an instrument fails under normal usage, OEM's should and will cover repair costs but if an instrument fails again, or frequently due to operator error the OEM could and should charge for parts and labor and travel, even though the unit is under warranty.  Although such a stance would be unpopular for end-users, it is really no different than what you might experience in other areas of your life.  If you use your SUV to haul a boat that exceeds the vehicles gross towing rate you will probably damage your transmission or rear axle.  Should you expect Ford or GM pay for that?   The honest answer is, no.

Whether you bought the instrument new and are under the original warranty, or if you have purchased an extended warranty, make sure you understand just what kinds of failures are covered.   Ask up front.   Even if you purchase refurbished instruments, there is a limit to they nature of the failures that are covered (BTW - you should always insist on a minimum of a 6 month warranty on refurbished equipment). New or used, a warranty is a quality statement by the provider.   Buying instruments "AS IS" or with a "Money Back Guarantee" should set off alarm bells that the low price option that looks so attractive today, could prove to be a costly investment in the future.   Caveat Emptor...   

What options should you consider when the warranty expires?   That will be the subject of our next blog...

 

April 12, 2013

Who’s Minding The Store?

It has been said that the French love Jerry Lewis.  Books have even been written about it (well, at least one book).store   I would not presume to question French culture…however even Jerry’s old partner Dean Martin sang “Everbody loves somebody sometime…”

Still, when French scientists need to automate ‘cell culture‘ and other time or temperature sensitive assays, they (and researchers from many nations) require automated storage devices (…all that for a ‘store’ reference?)

One of the more common instruments that enable extended walkaway time (the ability to automate multiple plate runs of any given assay) is the automated incubator.  Actually, the term incubator is a bit on a misnomer as these “plate hotels” can have a variety of temperature and/or humidity ranges that enable their use in a wide variety of assays.  To further complicate that definition, said plate hotels can also be used to store plate lids, tip boxes and tube racks.

Ambient – Perhaps the most common of all plate storage devices, ambient hotels can be as simple the removable storage racks found on plate mover robots such as theCaliper/PE Twistetwister iir II or the PAA KiNEDx or even dedicated plate stackers like the Thermo FisherRapidStak.   Many plate reader companies (Molecular DevicesBioTekBMG Labtech…etc) also offer dedicated ambient stacker options.   Additionally, Liconic,  , Agilent,Hi-Res Bio and Thermo Fisher(Kendro/Hereaus) also offer stacker hotels with built-in elevators/plate presenters that are also used in their temp/humidity controlled devices.   Hi-Res Bio also offers the PicoServe for robot arm access.  For the most part, users only need to consider if their assays require random access of individual plates or stacked storage (one plate on top on another).  Stacking plate racks follow what is known as a LIFO or Last In, First Out paradigm.  This is great for empty plates that will be fed into a system for simple tasks such as plate replication or reformatting.    Some folks even use this as a means of eliminating lids, as the plate above acts as the lid for the plate below – top plate is a blank).  Random access racks (individual plate holders) are great for assays where you need to treat each plate uniquely such as hit picking or ELISA.  Plate racks come in portrait or landscape orientation and some devices allow for bar code verification or delidding options.

Heated/Cooling – Options start to become more limited when you need environmental control.   Small batch options include self-contained single plate devices froIncubator_Family-09-2011_02_056bb39b14InHeco, which can be stacked on top of each other as well as recirculating fluid locaThermal-Plate-Stacker-Part-STKRtors fromMéCour.  MéCour also offers a recirculating fluid jacket for Twister II racks.  For more than a handful of plates, there are three well established providers;

  • Liconic – For well over a decade, this little juggernaut from Lichtenstein has created a formidable offering of products, all designed for liquid handler or robot manipulator access.   They also offer ambient hotels that utilize many of the core components used in their environmental models.  The range of products covers just about any application you can come up with!  Just a word of caution, depending upon the age of the instrument, you may find that there are design variations that can make post sales support challenging.
  • Thermo Fisher -Thermo acquired Kendro in 2005 and carried on the Cytomat/Heraeus (and Sorvall) product lines.   Originally, the Heraeus products were co-developed with Liconic and shared many common components and needs, but more recepicoservent products are of a completely new design.
  • Hi-Res Biosolutions – a relative newcomer to storage, but a very impressive line of products ranging from the 8 position Plate Chill cooled racks to high-capacity plate or tube storage.

End users, OEM’s  and system integrators have a wide variety of choices when it comes to extending assay walk-away time.   The French may indeed love Jerry Lewis but researchers love having time to perform higher value tasks due to the reliability of plate storage devices.

April 3, 2013

Have I Got A Tip For You…

the-graduate

“I want to say one word to you. Just one word.  Are you listening ? Plastics.” - The Graduate, 1967

Automated liquid handlers are very quickly (if not already there) becoming commodity products.   While every liquid handling manufacturer claims certain features or twists on how they do things, ultimately they all do pretty much the same thing…suck and spit (keep it clean people, we’re running a blog here…)  One sure sign of ‘commoditization’ is when third parties begin to offer accessories that compliment or compete with a particular product and in the case of liquid handlers,  that most commonly means disposable pipette tips.

Wondering if there any performance or reliability issues associated with the use of third party tips? tips To be sure, original equipment manufacturers (OEM’s) test and warranty their products using tips that they manufacture.   It is reasonable then for them to discourage the use of third-party tips insofar as performance guarantees are concerned.   Additionally, most of the OEM’s have made significant investments in the creation and maintenance of plastic injection molds that they or their supplier uses to stamp out their tips… so there is of course an understandable financial desire for them to want customers to purchase only OEM tips.

Insofar as periodic maintenance is concerned, end users should note that if they are performing routing CV checks (either gravimetrically or via a dye test), the tester needs to consider that differences in accuracy or precision may be affected by badly formed tips but that holds true regardless of who makes the tip.

However, it is not reasonable for an OEM to claim that the use of non-OEM tips “might” void the equipment’s warranty.  That’s a bit of a scare tactic that upon further reflection speaks more directly to lost consumable revenue than the fear of tip induced hardware failure.   I mean, if a tip gets stuck on a mandrel instead of getting shucked, I guess yeah, you could experience a crash that could damage the liquid handler.  Crashes do happen but such occurrences are rare once a tip is in production as most of the third-party providers I have dealt with have very stringent QC programs.    If you want to err on the side of caution, consider using OEM tips for new purchases and evaluate third-party tips once the warranty expires (usually 1yr).

Looking for alternative tip providers;

Corning/Axygen -   Agilent/V11, Beckman Coulter, BioTek, Caliper/PE, Dynamic Devices, Hamilton, Molecular Devices, Tecan, Qiagen

Labcon - Beckman Coulter

Phenix Research – Agilent/V11, Beckman Coulter,  Caliper/PE,  Eppendorf, Molecular Devices, Tecan, Qiagen

Thermo Fisher/Molecular BioProducts – Agilent/V11, Beckman Coulter, BioTek, Caliper/PE,  Molecular Devices, Tecan, Qiagen